It is great to meet you Doug. I like your style. Doug I am a very simple person. I am not looking to make a great deal of money, just some to supplement my retirement income. I have become involved with Wealthy Affiliate which I feel is a very good training site. But I find any training they provide I can also find on google. My major problem is that I get wrapped up in the social network where I have done very well with ranking, but there is no monetary advantage to this. I have begun to dig into your training and I am wondering this. We use WP at WA. I am only interested in building a decent amazon business. I spend $49 dollars a month for WA with the training. This includes being able to produce 25 website. Would I be better off hosting elsewhere and build my sites? I know I can make this work. I just need to find the right formula. I know you are a busy person so I am hoping that you will take the time to point me in the right direction.
My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.
Reviews traditionally do a great job of converting (turning clicks on links into sales on the other end) for you. If you’re going to do a review, you’ll want to include at least one affiliate link to the book in the post. Unless you’re participating in an author’s blog tour or some such, you may want to avoid linking to the author’s various sites and social media pages. It’s up to you, but the fewer things in the post there are to click, the more likely people will click your affiliate links (you can always link to favorite authors in a blogroll list over on your menu). 

LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.
Affiliate marketing is the internet version of getting paid on commission. You sign up with Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders, or other online sellers, then promote books on your blog by including special affiliate links (on the surface, these links don’t appear any different from regular links, and they can go to specific book pages, to searches, or to category pages in the bookstore).
I know you want me to tell you what the best niche – with high traffic, low competition, and most revenue potential – is for you to target, but unfortunately, there is no one size fits all answer for that. It's like asking me what the best dress for you to wear to a wedding is. The “best dress” depends on your body type, skin tone, hair color, hair style, flaw areas, etc. Finding a blogging niche is no different. It will depend on your personal interests, knowledge, willingness to learn and what you're willing to do to compete.
SEO is one of the viable and reliable ways to drive traffic to an affiliate website. However, marketing using SEO can be very difficult due to its competitive and technical nature. In this book, Jason McDonald covers breaks down the process of optimizing your website for the search engines in seven steps. It focuses on helping you master the fundamentals and teaches you how build a successful SEO campaign in a practical manner that anyone can understand.
Because the site is ranking #1 in Google for this (and probably ranks very well for other related terms), they are probably making great money.  This is probably easily a $100 to $200 a day website.  That's right, I would not be surprised if this site was pulling in $3k to $6k or more each month.  In fact it could be more, but its hard to guess without knowing all the traffic they are receiving.
I believe you need a disclaimer if you include Amazon affiliate links on your site, but you only require a privacy policy if you also collect data (name, email address, etc.) from your readers. Here’s a link that may help: https://termsfeed.com/blog/disclaimer-amazon-associates/ Partnering with Book Depository has been a good experience for me. It’s really easy to create links and their affiliate portal is very user friendly.
Generally speaking, we recommend keeping your site focused on one niche. Otherwise you'll confuse your readers and hurt your brand. You're better off with separate sites for separate categories The exception to this might be if you promoted SEO/web hosting/other digital products that would aid people from your primary niche (say, dog training for example) who want to build their own businesses using affiliate marketing. There needs to be some sort of clear connection about how the products and niches relate.

Once you've protected your prospecting pool, maximize your affiliate program by working with the best and leaving the rest. As the old 80/20 adage implies, most of your revenue will come from a very small percentage of your affiliates. Because it can be time-consuming to manage a larger affiliate network, consider selecting only a few companies initially, and interview them before signing them on. Affiliates are an extension of your sales force and represent your online brand, so choose partners carefully.


Over the course of 6 months I’ve made $1300 with Amazon Affiliates alone with the majority of that coming from about 15 different posts. Each month I am seeing a steady and slow increase in my affiliate earnings as I continue to create content that recommends helpful products, even when my traffic is lower. My DA is at 39 and I average about 100,000 page views every month.
While your site is still new, it's a good idea to start capitalizing on someone else's audience. Continue focusing on building your own content, but also considering writing content for a few big, high-traffic blogs that are relevant for your niche. By writing content for a bigger site, you are able to get in front of another audience and showcase your expertise on a particular topic. This will eventually lead to more traffic to your site, as well. 
Matthew owns an internet marketing blog that has won many awards and has been featured on various big brand websites such as Entrepreneur and ProBlogger. Matt is known for producing outstanding high-quality content that sticks out from the competition. The blog specialises in producing high-quality tutorials and case studies that help with things like link building, social media and traffic generation.
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