But I think the biggest deciding factor in this, goes back to the site as a whole and all of the other posts. Are the genuine? Is the blogger constantly trying to push products? I’d like to think I’ve been doing this long enough that my audience knows I’m not out to make a quick buck – and I think even relatively new bloggers can prove this based on their other content.
MY biggest struggle is knowing how to put the promotion together and having everything in place when you promote it. I would kill for a Step-by-Step hold your hand and let me show you once how to do it correctly Mapped Blueprint. I have seen lots of sales pages but when you get them from the vendor they look a lot of the times nothing like the Org sales page, have never written a sales page before and it becomes overwhelming and confusing and then totally frustrating
Taking the financial analysis a stage further, think about the potential profits you can make from each affiliate sale. You’ll have to sell hundreds of low priced items to make a reasonable return, and it may be better to promote premium products where one sale could generate hundreds of dollars. For example, an ebook on cat breeding tips might generate five dollars in commission for each sale. An ebook detailing a profitable gambling system might sell for ten times more and net you much higher commissions. 

The traffic volume he gets is significant when you figure that most people who are interested in travel have disposable income.  This means they are more likely to spend money on luxury items, making them a perfect buying demographic for products.  In the past, Matt has had some CPA offers on his posts where he's talked about the best travel credit cards.  Those offers earn income similar to NerdWallet.com, that when someone clicks his link and applies for a credit card, he gets paid a referral fee.  It looks like those products are gone now, and he's decided to focus strictly on book sales and keep his blog free of other display advertising (Kudos to you Matt).  If I had to guess, I'm sure Matt is making at least $50k per month on his book sales seeing as much traffic as he gets.
first off, show visitors that you have a great site by getting a better theme! You did not get a penalty because of affiliate content, nor have I ever heard of, however, I have heard of sites in the past getting penalty for having do follow links to affiliate programs such as amazon, remember, google does not like you giving credit to a site in exchange for receiving paid compensation, so ask yourself, are your external links nofollow? this may also include any buttons/graphics that link to affiliate sites that do not have a no follow attribute, not going to go to much into this, so I am going to assume your content is ok, if it is, then you need to check your link portfolio; maybe you have too many low quality links and/or you may have over-optimized anchor/text in your link building efforts; bad links, over optimization are common link issues that could cause your site to get a penalty, as it is not about what you are writing about, if all else fails, then hire seo consultant for an entire site autdit, they will go through your site tooth and nail, and see why you have lost your rankings. good luck.
A niche can be something broad, but most affiliate marketers will drill down into sub-categories. For example, I may want to have a website about cars, but that is way too broad. So, maybe I’ll focus on just Ford vehicles. Even then, the niche could be too broad, so I might dig down deeper and have a site that solely focuses on the Ford Mustang. I might even decide to take it one step further and focus on classic For Mustangs. Heck, I might even focus on a specific year, such as the 1969 Ford Mustang, and I would be THE expert for that very specific niche.
It is important to note, however, that StudioPress is now a subsidiary of WPEngine which is the company that actually does the web hosting on which StudioPress’s Genesis framework runs. The affiliate program only works with choosing the StudioPress framework and themes, not the actual hosting on WPEngine. WPEngine has a separate affiliate program for its hosting services, which yes, is a bit confusing.
Once you understand your "why" and your goals, make a short list of things you like that are specific enough that you can become the go-to expert on that topic, such as a particular type of camera lens, how to bake gluten free, or where to buy the best hand-made creative toys for toddlers. Be specific. Love your topic. Be different. Know your "Why". Set goals. And keep at it! This is a long-term commitment, so be sure you're consistent and ready to put in the effort!
Another one of the highest paying and most popular dating affiliate programs is eHarmony, which is based on the actual earnings that can be made from each referred sale. Up to $188 can be made from a single sale. In general, the members at eHarmony are typically looking to find serious long term relationships, so many of them are willing to pay extra to find similar people.

Previously known as Affiliate Window but now officially referred to as “AWIN” after acquiring Zanox a few years ago, this network claims to work with over 13,000 active advertisers and 100,000 publishers (affiliates). Founded in Germany, AWIN’s merchants primarily hail from Europe (especially Great Britain) although the U.S. network is growing rapidly. AWIN is currently active in 11 countries.
Forms of new media have also diversified how companies, brands, and ad networks serve ads to visitors. For instance, YouTube allows video-makers to embed advertisements through Google's affiliate network.[18][19] New developments have made it more difficult for unscrupulous affiliates to make money. Emerging black sheep are detected and made known to the affiliate marketing community with much greater speed and efficiency.[citation needed]
I'm not saying that as a recipe blog owner that you need to keep up with what the Food Network is doing. But, you do need to understand that pictures are required if you want to have success in that niche. Looking at all of the popular indie blogs on the topic will make that clear. Are you willing to MAKE the recipes you'll be blogging about and take pictures of them? Are you ready to invest in a good camera and spend time reading tutorials learning how to take better pictures? Every niche you look into will have a “minimum” formula across the successful indie blogs within them. Make sure you're willing to meet it. If not, you're going into the niche without the ability to truly compete and wasting your time. 

You only have to look at some of the most popular videos on Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube to know just how much people love animals. It is difficult to get through the day without coming across at least one cute cat or dog video. And people just love their pets! They treat them like part of the family, and even when it comes to shopping for their pets – they really do know how to spend!
Have relatable products to the content on the site. Don't advertise the latest video games for sale on a site that's about fishing. The traffic coming to your site is full of potential customers which have clicked on your site for a reason; the site content. Having products which relate to that content can dramtically increase your amazon affiliate earnings.
This is an interesting style review website that reads more like a magazine than a review site. This definitely helps give it some more credit than throwing a up a bunch of products and hoping people read them. It’s interesting that it takes a different approach, rather than writing long content, it focuses on a clean layout and video reviews to show people the product they’re testing, racking in 2.3 million monthly viewers. This is incredibly valuable for people willing to buy, but want to see the product in a video demo before purchasing. Now compare this site to what the site looked like in 2008 (here).
Continuing with the recipe blog scenario, I'd be comfortable with that because it has tons of potential to market a variety of products: pots, pans, cooking utensils (like particular measuring spoons or spatulas), kitchen appliances (like handheld mixers or crockpots), specialty foods (recommend a specific oil that is hard to find – link to it at Amazon), aprons, cookbooks, cutlery sets, bakeware – this list goes on and on. I love niches like this that have few limitations on what you can market and tons of potential merchants to partner with. I've already discussed how to make money from a blog once you can confirm there are things you can market. 

Back in these early days, the site was still called “Tom’s Hardware and Performance Guide” and its domain was sysdoc.pair.com — pair.com being a Pittsburgh-based hosting company. Today’s domain, tomshardware.com, was added on September 11, 1997, followed by additional language versions over time, including German, Japanese, Polish, French, Chinese, Italian, Turkish and others — some operated by Tom’s Guides Publishing, Inc., and others based on franchise agreements.
Great post – I’m a bit late in seeing this it seems!I have a question around how you assess the metrics and in turn success of these websites. It’s obvious where the money is coming in for most of them but Im wondering how you assess 50em.com? Its a great looking site but it has around 350-400 organic views a month and does not rank 1st, 2nd or 3rd for most keywords – not even its main target keyword -ontraport vs infusionsoft. Are you assuming its successful because of the high commission rates for these products and they might make 20 sales a month or is there other signs you see that indicate its a profitable site (or do you know the owner!)?

This book is written in a question-and-answer format, which makes it especially simple for the affiliate marketing beginner. I found myself nodding right along with the list of questions, presented in the table of contents—it’s comforting to see the questions that you’re asking yourself laid out for you. Now you know that you’re not the only one wondering these things.


Baby Gear really go that extra mile by actually buying every product that they review. Now, obviously this is a lot of work and cost but the payoff is extreme credibility and great content. This just isn’t possible for a lot of blogs, either because of the cost, or the time involved or simply the niche they are in. However, the thing to take away from this is that customers value credibility.
When promoting affiliate offers, just make sure you are fully aware of all the terms and conditions attached to your affiliate program. Some programs can be strict about how they allow you to promote their products. For example, some may limit you to banner ads and links only, while others will allow you to use paid advertising, but won't allow email marketing. 
Hi Jamie, awesome content that is very helpful esp with the resources, links and the rich discussions. Want to start e-commerce and blog for money…selling others products, want to go full on with this, tired of the daily routine crunch working for others. I live in a developing country (PNG) that has high internet costs (work still in progress with getting rates down…) so will see how I go with your posts. Any advise? Don’t have a website yet, have to build one I guess….
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[14] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[9]
Another way to check whether or not your niche is something that you can promote affiliate offers on is actually to look at Google AdWords and check out the cost-per-click for keywords related to the niche that you might want to enter. Head over to Google AdWords, log in, and under Tools and Analysis, choose Keyword Planner. You want to click on Search For New Keyword Ad Group Ideas and enter a few keywords related to your niche: Travel, traveling, things like that. Click on Get Ideas, then click on Keyword Ideas and pay attention to the suggested bid. The suggested bid is basically how much an AdWords advertiser pays for one click in AdWords for people searching for this particular keyword.
Let's pretend you love to cook and want to create a recipe blog. “Recipes” is a very competitive arena to build a brand new brand in. So you may want to narrow the focus a bit and choose a specific recipe style – low carb recipes, Paleo recipes, recipes portioned for one (AKA single people living alone), low-fat recipes, dessert recipes, holiday recipes, etc. Almost every broad niche has multiple sub-sects within it that may hold an opportunity for you. That said, I'd ensure the domain and brand you go with have the ability to expand into wider content and monetization opportunities as your brand grows.
This was one of the first Amazon Affiliate Website Examples I ever came across. I thought it was incredibly simple, before I saw some other websites that were even worse. A lot of it is what you would expect. A wordy homepage with a couple of pages in the menu bar that all resemble more keyword targeting than actual helpful navigation. I keep wondering if they actually reviewed all those different kitchen sinks, because that would be a lot of work installing and disassembling numerous sinks to see how they work. Likely not, their “About Us” page just says a “Mother of two” which tells me as the reader, if you’re not putting your name on this, your reviews are probably just as generic. Usually if an “About” page doesn’t list a name or company, I assume that the website is just as generic.
Clicking on the product name takes you directly to the merchant's page through the affiliate's link. (Incidentally, you may notice this affiliate has stopped most of his affiliate links being displayed in the status bar when you hover over them, by using a small piece of JavaScript. This makes the link more attractive to nervous clickers who might be scared away by the complicated looking URL and also helps to prevent link hijacking.)

Greatist.com is a health publication that was started in 2011.  The traffic growth over the last couple years is incredible, and the site has become a full fledged media resource.  Greatist.com has a larger staff, and has purchased a number of other online businesses.  The top keyword “healthy breakfasts” gets an estimated 62,000 searches per month, but the long tail traffic that Greatist.com gets is truly incredible.


I believe you need a disclaimer if you include Amazon affiliate links on your site, but you only require a privacy policy if you also collect data (name, email address, etc.) from your readers. Here’s a link that may help: https://termsfeed.com/blog/disclaimer-amazon-associates/ Partnering with Book Depository has been a good experience for me. It’s really easy to create links and their affiliate portal is very user friendly.
If you feel like this is not working out, this is not something you’re interested in or not something you want to be involved in, you can go back to Qauntcast, look at another site, and see what that broad niche is, and then repeat the process. You can also do the same thing at Yahoo! Answers, which is like an old-school version of Quora, but they actually have a lot of good questions that are asked there that can lead you into smaller niches. Just Google ‘Yahoo! Answers’, click on the first result. Then you want to type in the same keyword you used at Quora in Yahoo! Answers and click on Search Answers. Under the search result, you want to choose Most Answers. Of course, there’s going to be some questions in here that don’t really make sense for your niche, but there’ll be some gems in here too. For example we have this: What are your 10 must visit travel destinations around the world? That could be a blog topic right there. You could create a blog about travel destinations that you should visit before you die. You cover the most popular ones or some maybe that are great but not as well known. What was your most memorable beach or seaside vacation? You could create a blog about the greatest beach or seaside destinations in the world.
Internet Retailer Top 500 merchant, JanSport, partnered with Rakuten Marketing on a series of cross-channel marketing campaigns promoting the launch of its Disney Collection, which features popular Disney characters on JanSport apparel and accessories. The campaigns, executed across search, display and affiliate strategies, leveraged valuable consumer data and insights to focus on shoppers who expressed the most interest in Disney themed products.

I place emphasis on the “interested” aspect, as you may end up sticking with this topic for an extended period of time. As we’ve said previously, successful affiliate marketers are more likely to receive opportunities to sell other products in the future. In the same way you don’t want to build up a resume full of jobs you hate, don’t sell products for an industry that means nothing to you.
While the traffic estimates are lower than some of the other sites on this list, people in the baby gear niche are an important customer base because they definitely purchase products.  This is a big industry and I would guess that the conversion rate for this site is slightly higher than OutDoorGearLab.com.  Typically when someone researches a baby product, they are typically looking to buy that baby product.  If someone is researching a tent, they may just be looking around at different options that they can compare for their next camping trip – not necessarily to buy that tent.  Most of their traffic is organic, and continuing the trend of well ranked long form content, their top post is 8,800 words long (which is a beast of an article).  If I had to take a guess at revenue, it would probably be north of 30k per month for this site based on traffic.
That’s where market research comes into play. It is important for you to make sure that there is actually a demand for the product niche that you are looking to market. Fair enough – if you came up with a revolutionary product that no one has ever witnessed before – then that’s a whole different ballgame. In that case, you would have to market your latest invention on a whole different level.
This is extremely helpful information for somebody who is a newbie blogger! I’ve been looking for an all inclusive “guide” to explain affiliate marketing and this is the best I’ve found. Quick question for you – when you talk about the cookie expiration date, is that from the date that you post your review/recommendation or from the date that the reader clicks on the link? For example, the affiliate links you posted in this post are well over 90 days old but if I click on one of them now and buy that product, do you still get paid? Just curious how that works.
TechRadar is a huge website devoted to reviewing the latest technology trends. The site has dedicated review sections for literally every kind of piece of technology you can image, including consoles, smart phones, tablets and laptops. They also product very informative articles about different items, helping you make a valid choice when choosing a product.

If you return to the affiliate's program review page you'll see that further down the page the affiliate lists products that don't get the five-star seal of approval. He also provides links to reviews of these "not recommended" products which explain why they're not recommended. Reading his reviews, it does indeed sound like he knows what he's talking about - his reviews are credible and seem unbiased. Most of them don't seem to have affiliate programs, and he hasn't bothered to link to them through affiliate links.

Thank you for this post! I’ve been debating going the Amazon Affiliate route, but am kinda stuck on the privacy policy that needs to be included. I’m not exactly sure what needs to be put on that, and I don’t want to state something on the policy that isn’t accurate. I was kind of wondering what other bloggers do, and I’ve only seen the disclaimer on very few sites that links are affiliate links. I should look into Book Depository too!
There are some things that are confusing to a newbie such as "affiliate tracking" that isn't clearly explained, but (I'm old school) I have noticed that it is typical of writers in this day and age to assume that the readers understand most everything the author is talking about. Even when I took web design classes at a local college the instructors assume ALL students are millenials (I'm a gen X) and will not explain in more detail unless asked.
Look for a gravity score of 30 or more, because these products have a proven track record of selling well for a number of different affiliates. Products, especially new products, with gravity scores under 30 may work but are more risky. Gravity scores of greater than 100 mean the product’s popular. You could have competition, but don’t worry about that. The important thing is that there’s lots of demand.
Hi Jay. Love the examples of profit making websites! For anyone who has been banging their head against a wall trying to make a few bucks, these sites show exactly how it’s done which is crucial when you are starting out. It’s so easy to get overwhelmed checking out lots of other sites that may look great but may not necessarily be making money. I also get those Amazon emails all the time. I think I’ll take a closer look and see if I can find a new niche!
In addition, we spent thousands of hours interviewing hundreds of today's most successful affiliate marketing masters. This book is a compilation of their secrets and proven successful ideas. Additionally, we give you hundreds of tips and tricks to ensure your website is optimized for maximum search engine effectiveness, which will drive business to your Web site and increase sales and profits. You will find actual case studies from companies who have used our techniques and achieved unprecedented success. If you are interested in learning hundreds of hints, tricks, and secrets on how to implement affiliate marketing, optimizing your website for maximum search engine effectiveness, developing a cost-effective marketing campaign, and ultimately earning enormous profits, this book is for you.
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