Thanks for this guide, it is very helpful. I was wondering if you could help me with one query. I am taking your gravity advice into consideration, filtering to a range of 5-25; however, I find that this excludes almost every product in most of the criteria I am interested in. Is this likely to change at any point; I assume the gravity is updated regularly?

It is great to meet you Doug. I like your style. Doug I am a very simple person. I am not looking to make a great deal of money, just some to supplement my retirement income. I have become involved with Wealthy Affiliate which I feel is a very good training site. But I find any training they provide I can also find on google. My major problem is that I get wrapped up in the social network where I have done very well with ranking, but there is no monetary advantage to this. I have begun to dig into your training and I am wondering this. We use WP at WA. I am only interested in building a decent amazon business. I spend $49 dollars a month for WA with the training. This includes being able to produce 25 website. Would I be better off hosting elsewhere and build my sites? I know I can make this work. I just need to find the right formula. I know you are a busy person so I am hoping that you will take the time to point me in the right direction.
This is an interesting style review website that reads more like a magazine than a review site. This definitely helps give it some more credit than throwing a up a bunch of products and hoping people read them. It’s interesting that it takes a different approach, rather than writing long content, it focuses on a clean layout and video reviews to show people the product they’re testing, racking in 2.3 million monthly viewers. This is incredibly valuable for people willing to buy, but want to see the product in a video demo before purchasing. Now compare this site to what the site looked like in 2008 (here).
The thing I like the most about the site is the way it feels.  All of the Amazon affiliate links are extremely well integrated, and they've done some custom design work to make some of their images feel interactive.  Another trend here is that the owners of this site, own similar sites in several other niches.  You can tell which sites are owned by the owners of this site when you look at the bottom of the site and notice that they link internally to their other web properties.  This is becoming a popular trend, with the folks over at DigitalMarketer.com doing the same thing with some of their projects, like SurvivalLife.com and DIYReady.com.  It's hard to estimate the total revenue for this site, but because the call-to-actions on the site are so good, it would not surprise me if this site was doing over 70K per month in Amazon Affiliate income every month.

In conclusion, I have covered 4 niche websites that I think are targeting keywords that have great search volume and high CPCs.  I discussed the pros and cons of the layouts of the websites to give you an idea of how I think a niche site should be monetized.  Remember, I did NOT go into whether or not anyone should be targeting these keywords as I did not really look at the competition levels.  My guess is that these keywords would be too competitive for me to go after.  I will discuss competition, and how to analyze the Google competition in detail in future posts.

RunnerClick.com is an interesting Amazon Affiliate website.  It's  interesting in the fact that it hasn't been around forever, but it's gained rapid momentum due to their consistent outreach efforts.  You can see that their link building efforts have been a success when you look at the historical data on Ahrefs, that shows the trend in referring domains.  They rank extremely well for many buyer-oriented keywords in the running space, and have a ton of product reviews.

Michelle Schroeder-Gardener launched MakignSenseofCents.com in 2013.  While Ahrefs estimates that she's getting 49,000 hits per month, her actual pageviews are much higher as she's part of the AdThrive network, which only allows websites to be a part of it if they have over 100,000 page views per month.  You can see in her income reports, that this income makes up an extremely small portion of her entire revenue streams.  Her biggest earners are her Bluehost affiliate commissions and her course that she sells.
I’ll talk about adding advertising to your book blog in the next post in this series (hey, there’s no reason to limit yourself to one source of income!), but, in the meantime, you may want to check out How You Can Make Money Promoting My Ebooks (and other people’s too), a post I did a couple of months ago. It talks more about Smashwords, in particular, and how to find authors offering high affiliate percentages over there.
Affiliate marketing is the internet version of getting paid on commission. You sign up with Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders, or other online sellers, then promote books on your blog by including special affiliate links (on the surface, these links don’t appear any different from regular links, and they can go to specific book pages, to searches, or to category pages in the bookstore).
Hi Gina, thank you for this helpful video. I was looking at the beauty niche as I would like to promote latest make up items but didn’t get far with that as the only closer related one with the 6 gravity was the kabuki make up brush? The other idea for me was to promote manifestation miracle as this book has truly changed my life and in an indirect way also brought me to affilorama. Do you think that might be a better starting point? And how would I call that niche? Any tips are welcome as I am totally new to this :)

Hi Rae, I think the right niche is the most important step in affiliate marketing. If you choose the wrong niche, you can be doomed from the very beginning. Need a buying niche not just one where people are looking for information. Also you only mentioned it briefly at the end, I think promoting something you know about or is your passion makes the process a lot easier. Great post though, Tom. 

I'm never comfortable building a site in a niche where the potential revenue stream boils down to only a few avenues or merchants. A long time ago I created a site in a niche where there was only one affiliate program to monetize it with. When the affiliate program shut down, I was left with a site I'd spent time and energy on – that was ranking and had traffic – and I had no way to monetize it. Granted, this was before AdSense existed, but even if Adsense had existed, it being the only potential revenue stream should have sent me in another direction.
Michelle Schroeder-Gardener launched MakignSenseofCents.com in 2013.  While Ahrefs estimates that she's getting 49,000 hits per month, her actual pageviews are much higher as she's part of the AdThrive network, which only allows websites to be a part of it if they have over 100,000 page views per month.  You can see in her income reports, that this income makes up an extremely small portion of her entire revenue streams.  Her biggest earners are her Bluehost affiliate commissions and her course that she sells.

Find products that offer an affiliate program. Check companies that list product owners with affiliate programs such as Clickbank.com, Neverblue.com or Commission Junction. Amazon.com has an affiliate program as well. Service providers such as web hosts, autoresponder distribution firms and review sites of consumer, professional and business products are other alternatives.
Yaro Starak is the founder and writer of Entrepreneurs-Journey.com. Since 2005 through this blog, his email newsletter and in training programs under the EJ Insider Membership, Yaro has taught thousands of people how to make a full time income from blogging part time, how to buy and sell blogs and websites, and how to successfully launch an information product business. Follow Yaro on Twitter at @YaroStarak.
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